Site News

Virtual Festival of Geology (and other news)

Posted by John Henry on

The Geologists’ Association's annual Festival of Geology is virtual this year on 7th and 8th November 2020. We used to have tables for this one day event to sell our stock, but retired three years ago. However, the virtual fair provides an opportunity to sell again, and all purchases will be discounted by 15% from Friday 6th until Sunday 15th November 2020. Update: this offer has now expired.In other news, the coronavirus lockdown has given me more time for cataloguing and uploading a backlog of maps and books. This includes a new collection of Old Series one inch Geological maps...

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Geological Maps of Oxfordshire

Posted by John Henry on

As we work from home, Nineteenth Century Geological Maps is continuing to operate and delivery of purchases has not been affected, so far. A silver lining is the increased amount of time available to describe, photograph and upload a large backlog of interesting material, and here is the first instalment – on Oxfordshire and environs.

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Eastern Europe – from Nineteenth Century Empires to the Iron Curtain Nations

Posted by John Henry on

Maps of the geology of Eastern Europe reflect the historic political instability of the region. Before the First World War, empires prevailed – Austrian /Austro-Hungarian, Russian, German. Within these were provinces or regions, whose names have been lost as they were subsumed and/or divided by subsequent nation states that followed the break-up of empires. With the drastic shifts of population and changes of languages and sometimes of alphabets, place names on early maps are often difficult to locate in the present.

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Minerals and Mining

Posted by John Henry on

The search for minerals and fuel drove much early geological investigation. The earliest account of mining was Georgius Agricola’s De Re Metallica (on the nature of Metals) and remained the authority for nearly two centuries after its publication, in Latin, in 1556

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History of Geology in Wales

Posted by John Henry on

Best wishes for the New Year to all website visitors and customers. January's article features maps, memoirs and books concerning the geology of Wales and the rich history there of the development of geology. That Wales gives the names of three of the systems of the stratigraphical chart – Silurian, Ordovician and Cambrian and, until recently Precambrian, attests to the early exploration and conceptual thinking that occurred here.

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